Archives de catégorie : Billets

Appel à comm : Nature and Nation – Bucarest 2-4 déc 2011

STATE OF NATURE
2nd international workshop of the Nature&Nation network
Bucharest, Romania, 02-04 December 2011
Deadline: 20 September 2011

Introduction
Nature&Nation’s first workshop, held in Trento, Italy, in September 2010 was mainly focused on the first part of the nation-state combine.
In fact, the main issues of discussion on that occasion have been related to the role of nature in national identity discourses and rhetoric and vice versa. With this second workshop we want to look instead at the state, and at its role in transforming, representing and even creating nature.
States have had a significant role in the modification of landscapes and natural environments that has occurred during the nineteenth and twentieth century. Good part of this change may be ascribed to what James C. Scott has defined the high-modernist tendencies within modern nation-states. States, both under democratic and  otalitarian rule, have thus attempted to simplify, as to make more legible and manageable, both the landscapes and the systems of relationships, construed over centuries of settlement, that human communities had with these natural environments.
Modern states have thus proceeded at an appropriation of nature, in both its physical and symbolical facets, and attempted repeatedly to monopolize, beside other social systems of relationship, also the way society has interpreted nature. Both nature itself and the society/nature relationship have in fact been radically modified over the last two centuries by state-driven engineering projects, economic policies, propagandist rhetorics and legal systems. Determining property rights, planning urban and industrial development, implementing public/private transportations, building national parks, fighting malaria or other, and bloodier, wars have definitely played a major role in shaping the natural environment.

Aims and scope
In occasion of this 2nd workshop we are interested not only in the European context but also in the ways in which national states have included imperial/colonial natures and environments into the national framework.
We want to gather a variety of scholars, not only specialists in environmental history, but also political, cultural and social historians, historical geographers and historical anthropologists with an interest in nationalism, nature perception and/or symbolic politics. During the selection process both comparative analyses at the transnational level and specific case studies able to give new insights in the mechanism of state management of natural resources and symbolic uses of the natural world will be equally considered.

Practicalities
The workshop is limited to 20 participants. The working language is English.
Each selected participant will prepare a draft text that will be pre-circulated to workshop attendees in mid-November 2011. Each paper will be briefly presented by the author in a short talk (10 min.) and
then fully discussed by all the workshop attendees. After the workshop, all participants will be asked to revise their papers for possible inclusion in an edited volume to be submitted to an international academic press or as a journal special issue.

Prospective schedule
Friday, 02 December 2011 ­ Arrival and first session;
Saturday, 03 December 2011 ­ Further sessions;
Sunday, 04 December 2011 ­ Roundtable, conclusions and departure.

Funding and benefits
This event is funded and supported by the ‘Nicolae Titulescu’ University, the National School of Political Studies and Public Administration (NSPSPA) and The Center for the Study of Political Ideas (CeSIP), Bucharest, Romania.Workshop attendees will be granted free lodging in college accommodation and meals for the duration of the workshop. Unfortunately, we will not be able to cover travel expenses. More details will soon be available on the network’s website.

Application
To be considered as a workshop participant please post an abstract of up to 300 words and a very brief CV (1 page) on the application form (www.natureandnation.eu/workshops/bucharest/application-form) by 20 September 2011. For further information please feel free to contact info@natureandnation.eu

A PDF version of the call is available here: http://is.gd/stateofnature

le RUCHE

Réseau Universitaire en Histoire Environnementale

More Posts

Follow Me:
Twitter

Appel à contribution : The Living and Liveable City: Health, Lifestyle and Sustainability (Mars 2012)

Appel à proposition pour la conférence annuelle de l’Urban History Group

29-30 March 2012

St Catherine’s College Oxford

The Living and Liveable City: Health, Lifestyle and Sustainability

The city has long stood as a model for the organisation and reform of human life. People have historically been attracted (and, for large periods, repulsed) by the opportunities offered by urban living because cities act as the conduits through which money, ideas, goods and technologies are created, circulated and incorporated into everyday life. In order to be an attractive and liveable place, the city requires a healthy metabolism through which society can be organised and regulated effectively. As cities develop they require improvements to public health, environmental justice and access to housing, recreation, culture and employment. These opportunities need to be freely circulated in order to satisfy the insatiable appetite of both the living city and its citizens. However, it is important to keep in mind that such circulation has often not been the case in the past, and even the most well-intended planning reforms sometimes favoured the privileged districts and layers of urban society.

This conference thus focuses on the notion of the living and liveable city in a historical perspective. There are no chronological or geographical limits to this theme. The city has been long depicted as a living organism created from the interaction of natural resources with technologies, ideas and entrepreneurial flair. The idea of the living city is both an imagined and a real response to the threats posed to urban life from disease, squalor and other forms of social and racial injustice. Meanwhile, historians are beginning to view towns and cities as the products of flows of ‘socio-natural’ inputs and outputs. The infrastructural, technical and technological development of the living city thus impacts on the ways that citizens live in the city. To turn a living city into a liveable city has always required more than sewers, clean water and drains. It has also necessitated the provision of, and access to, housing, culture, recreation, open spaces and employment opportunities. Notions of environmental improvement, sustainability and the “urban renaissance” increasingly concern urban historians, and, whilst they have nuanced meanings to contemporary policy-makers and planners, they are rooted in the long history of cities and the ways in which they were made liveable. This conference seeks to explore the extent to which various social groups and agencies have created living and liveable cities throughout history.

Some issues that the conference seeks to consider include:

* The changing notion of the living and liveable city and its multi-faceted evolution over time
* The concepts of ‘improvement’, ‘renaissance’, ‘environment’, ‘health’ and ‘sustainability’ and how our understanding of them has changed over time
* The sectorial construct of the environmental city: as the whole or as separate areas of contamination, escape or distinction
* The circulation and flow of “natural” resources within cities and between cities and their natural hinterlands
* The changing perception of cities as healthy, liveable and attractive places as well as the realities of social and environmental injustice during different historical periods
* How and why urban elites and residents have made certain parts of cities healthier and more liveable places, whilst neglecting other parts inhabited by marginal social and ethnic groups
* The historical relationship between urbanisation, public health and social policy either in improving urban life or furthering social or racial segregation
* The role of institutions, including the market, in creating the liveable city
* The construction and diffusion of socio-technological innovations, ideologies and other practices designed to make towns and cities attractive places to live.

The conference committee invites proposals for individual papers as well as for individual sessions of up to three papers. Sessions that seek to draw comparisons across one or more countries, or open up new vistas for original research, are particularly encouraged. Abstracts of up to 500 words, including a title, name, affiliation and contact details should be submitted to the conference organisers and should indicate clearly how the content of the paper addresses the conference theme outlined above. Those wishing to propose sessions should provide a brief statement that identifies the ways in which the session will address the conference theme, a list of speakers and paper abstracts. The final deadline for proposals for sessions and papers is 30 September 2011.

In addition, the conference will again host its new researchers’ forum. This is aimed primarily at those who are at an early stage in a research project and who wish primarily to discuss ideas rather than present findings. New and current postgraduates working on topics unrelated to the main theme, as well as those just embarking on new research, are particularly encouraged to submit short papers for this forum.

Pour plus de détails vous pouvez contacter les organisateurs :

Dr Shane Ewen
School of Cultural Studies
Leeds Metropolitan University
Broadcasting Place
Woodhouse Lane
Leeds, LS2 9EN
e: s.ewen@leedsmet.ac.uk
t:+44 (0)113 812 3340

Dr Rebecca Madgin
Centre for Urban History
University of Leicester
Marc Fitch House
3-5 Salisbury Road
Leicester, LE1 7QR
e: rmm13@le.ac.uk
t: +44 (0)116 252 5068

le RUCHE

Réseau Universitaire en Histoire Environnementale

More Posts

Follow Me:
Twitter

Appel à communication. “Aux sources de la politique publique de l’environnement (1950-1960). Date butoir: 15 septembre 2011.

A l’occasion des quarante ans du ministère de l’Environnement, l’Association pour l’Histoire de la Protection de la Nature et de l’Environnement (AHPNE) et le Comité d’Histoire du Conseil général de l’Environnement et du Développement Durable organisent une journée d’étude le 16 novembre 2011 à Paris (La Défense). Intitulée “Aux sources de la politique publique de l’environnement (1950-1960), elle doit s’interroger sur la genèse de la politique de l’environnement comme label administratif, domaine public et catégorie de pensée en France dans les années 50 et 60.

Les propositions de communication doivent être envoyées avant le 15 septembre à Florian Charvolin (florian.charvolin@gmail.com).

Le texte complet de l’appel à communication est disponible ici:  AAC 40e anniversaire

le RUCHE

Réseau Universitaire en Histoire Environnementale

More Posts

Follow Me:
Twitter

Journée d’étude. La Rochelle. 8 septembre 2011. “L’environnement en mémoire”

Anne Bardot-Cambot et Laurence Tranoy organisent une journée d’étude sur le thème “L’environnement en mémoire: marqueurs, outils et perspectives” qui se tiendra à l’université de La Rochelle le 8 septembre 2011 (laboratoires CRHIA et LIENSs). Il s’agit de s’interroger sur la manière dont des sources a priori biologiques ou environnementales, au sens large, peuvent participer à une restitution historique d’un littoral ou plus globalement d’un paysage et comment, réciproquement, les mobiliers archéologiques peuvent aider à définir des évolutions environnementales ou à soulever des questions de cet ordre.

Le programme complet est disponible ici:  Journée d’étude Marqueurs Environnementaux

le RUCHE

Réseau Universitaire en Histoire Environnementale

More Posts

Follow Me:
Twitter

Parution : Environmental Histories of Montreal

Nos collègues québécois Michèle Dagenais et Stéphane Castonguay viennent de diriger l’ouvrage Metropolitan Natures Environmental Histories of Montreal, publié par University of Pittsburgh press, dans la collection “History of the urban environment”.

La table des matières et le texte de l’introduction peuvent être téléchargés sur le site de l’éditeur :

http://www.upress.pitt.edu/BookDetails.aspx?bookId=36205

le RUCHE

Réseau Universitaire en Histoire Environnementale

More Posts

Follow Me:
Twitter